Mar Vista Animal Medical Center

3850 Grand View Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90066

(310)391-6741

www.marvistavet.com

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July 2019

Monthly Newsletter

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(Photocredit: Morguefile.com)

  

WOULD YOU LIKE REGULAR PET CARE TIPS AND ANIMAL NEWS? LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Thank you for your patience (and patients) as we work through our challenges with bulk email. We have been posting links to our monthly newsletter but have not been able to actually email it out for several months now. We have a new bulk email service and are back on track.

TRAVEL SEASON FOR PETS AND PEOPLE TOGETHER!

It's time for vacations and weekend trips and many pets want to come, too. It may sound simple to just load Fido into the back seat and hit the road but there can be a lot more to it depending on where you are going. Here are some considerations:

  • Going Camping? Don't forget to include tick protection in your pet's regimen.
  • Going to a mosquito area? (Basically anywhere that isn't freezing cold or desert hot and dry). Heartworm season lasts until the first frost so you will need to protect your dog.
  • Products work retroactively so you need to use them when you get back (not before you go).
  • Be sure you microchip registration is in order in case of any unplanned escapes.
  • Paperwork is needed to fly by plane. You will need a health certificate, possibly an acclimation certificate if hot weather is expected, and other paperwork may be needed to qualify to fly in the cabin. Plan ahead.
  • Flat-faced breeds do not travel well so if you have a bulldog or a pug, boarding or baby sitter may be a safer choice than travel.
  • Look for pet friendly lodging at petswelcome.com.

Think about how the adventure will work for your pet and what facilities and equipment you will need to pack. Check with your airline for special requirements.

AND ABOVE ALL, HAVE A GREAT TRIP!!

FOR MORE DETAILS VISIT OUR PET TRAVEL PAGE BY CLICKING HERE

 

CONTINUATION OF LAST MONTH'S STORY ON
THE GRAIN-FREE DIET/HEART DISEASE CONNECTION

After the FDA released an update this past month, we are finding more and more people are aware of this problem but we are still seeing plenty of dog owners who need to be reached.

THE RECAP: The FDA has been investigating grain-free dog foods and their relationship with Dilative Cardiomyopathy, a condition where the heart muscle becomes flabby and weak.

WHAT WE KNOW: 515 dogs and 9 cats have been included in the reported group. 90% of these animals were on grain-free diets. 93% were eating a diet featuring peas or lentils. Deficiency of taurine, an amino acid, classically causes dilative cardiomyopathy in certain dog breeds and in cats but the animals reported do not have taurine deficiencies. It is not clear what about these diets is the problem. Investigators are cautioning against the use of "BEG" diets (BEG stands for Boutique-Exotic ingredient-Grain-free) diets.

Before the July 2019 update from the FDA, it was hard to say what constitutes a "boutique" diet and what exactly makes an ingredient exotic. There is now a published list of the diets that have had the most cases reported. Investigators recommend against feeding foods with peas, chickpeas, beans, tapioca, or lentils in the first 5 ingredients.

Here is the list of most frequently implicated brands:

  • Acana (67 reports)
  • Zignature (64 reports)
  • Taste of the Wild (53 reports)
  • 4Health (32 reports)
  • Earthborn Holistic (32 reports)
  • Blue Buffalo (31 reports)
  • Nature’s Domain (29 reports)
  • Fromm (24 reports)
  • Merrick (16 reports)
  • California Natural (15 reports)
  • Natural Balance (15 reports)
  • Orijen (12 reports)
  • Nature’s Variety (10 reports)
  • Nutrisource (10 reports)
  • Nutro (10 reports)
  • Rachael Ray Nutrish (10 reports)

Dogs and cats with food allergies commonly need a grain-free diet but normal animals absolutely do not. If your pet genuinely needs a grain-free diet for medical reasons, a proBNP blood test can be used to monitor heart muscle stretch before an actual clinical disease state is reached.

More sources:

https://news.vin.com/VINNews.aspx?articleId=53973&fbclid=IwAR1m5LK4W1wU1SZo7wDLXyEk2LZ6SUwYjXvqtU9VbK9zbj90bJBjFOmpslE

www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-investigation-potential-link-between-certain-diets-and-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy

www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-fdas-grain-free-diet-alert

   

INTERESTING EXTERNAL LINK

 

https://www.petsandparasites.org

The Companion Animal Parasite Council monitors parasite trends, educates both veterinary professionals and pet owners, and formulates guidelines on deworming and parasite protection. Lots of parasites are transmissible to humans, especially children. If this is all news to you, check out the website that CAPC has put together for the general public.

Pets are exposed to parasites by hunting and consuming prey (including eating bugs), eating uncooked foods, licking dirt off their feet, and from sharing areas with urban wildlife.

Children are exposed to parasites by not washing their hands effectively, running around barefoot, and eating inadequately washed or cooked foods.

Click the above link for more information.

  

DID YOU KNOW...

...that FLEAS CAN BE LETHAL?

Sadly, we need to make this announcement every summer. Fleas are famous for causing itchy skin but it is important to remember they are a blood-sucking parasite. A heavy number of fleas all drinking your pet's blood can create a life-threatening blood loss and you might not know, especially if your pet is not particularly itchy (only pets allergic to flea bites will be itchy).

The most vulnerable patients are: young kittens, older cats especially if they spend a lot of time outdoors, small dogs kept outdoors but fleas can kill any animal if there are enough of them.

Don't let fleas go unchecked because you think it is about itching. If you need help with flea control, remember, we are experts. Let us get you covered.


(Photocredit: Modified from
Public Domain image via Wikimedia Commons
)

 

IN OTHER NEWS:

The L.A. County Health Department has noted nearly twice as many rabid bats this year compared to last year.

People think of rabies as a problem for the third world but, in fact, usually 15% of local bats test positive for rabies. The reason we don't see rabies here is because of mandatory vaccination of companion animals.

Bats are the main reservoir species for the rabies virus in LA County, and the 2019 rabid bat season is underway. As of June 11th, a total of 9 rabid bats have been found so far in LA County this year. One of the rabid bats was found at a school, five were found outside of private residences, one was found outside of an apartment building, and two were found outside of businesses. For more information:

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/vet/rabiesmap2019.htm

 

Canine influenza outbreak in Oakland, CA. 200 dogs quarantined.

Keep in mind that canine flu is most contagious before symptoms set in and is still contagious for three weeks after symptoms resolve. Life-threatening pneumonia can result and to prevent small outbreaks from turning into large outbreaks (like what happened in Chicago 2015), the L.A. County Health Department has asked for all dogs who contact other dogs to get vaccinated asap so as to generate herd immunity.

https://abc7news.com/pets-animals/200-dogs-quarantined-after-canine-flu-outbreak-in-oakland/5371332/

 

Drug-resistant Salmonella linked to pig ear dog treats. 93 people sick. No deaths.

Contaminated pig ears have been linked to drug-resistant Salmonella infections in 27 states. A recall is in progress for Pet Supplies Plus.

https://www.cdc.gov/Salmonella/pet-treats-07-19/index.html

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